Hanoi Food Culture

Com is listed as favorite specialty of Hanoi thanks to its subtle scent of young glutinous rice packed in gemstone green lotus leaf. In cold winter, it is so great to enjoy the hot crunchy fired shrimp cakes by the West Lake. Trying the sweet taste of shrimp and chatting about old stories is really a great joy in such cold days of winter. Hanoi is surely a heaven in four season for any gourmet or who aim to be that.

Hanoi is one of Asia top 10 greatest street food cities and the most significant characteristics culture. Each food carries special taste. Hanoi people have the habit of enjoying foods according to the season in a year and time in a day. In autumn, Hanoi people are excited to celebrate the crop of Com (Green rice flakes) in Vong village. Com is listed as favorite specialty of Hanoi thanks to its subtle scent of young glutinous rice packed in gemstone green lotus leaf. In cold winter, it is so great to enjoy the hot crunchy fired shrimp cakes by the West Lake. Trying the sweet taste of shrimp  and chatting about old stories is really a great joy in such cold days of winter.

Hanoi and its environs are the birthplace of many quintessential Vietnamese dishes, such as pho and bun cha, and the city is often cited as one of the world's great food capitals.

It's a street eater's paradise, with a plethora of options for those who want to eat like a local. In fact, many swear that the best food in Hanoi is found on the sidewalk, with dishes that often feature fish sauce, lemongrass, chilies, and cilantro and other fresh herbs.

The city, which celebrated its one-thousandth birthday last year, has put those centuries to good use perfecting its curbside nibbles.

Although vendors often cook in small shop fronts, they serve their wares on the sidewalk, on small plastic tables and chairs that can seem woefully inadequate for overgrown foreigners.

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